Amy Ridenour, National Center for Public Policy Research

Shirley Sherrod falsely said Andrew Breitbart would “like to get us stuck back in the times of slavery. That’s where I think he’d like to see all black people end up again.” Then Sherrod said Breitbart is a racist, called Breitbart “vicious,” and then said Breitbart’s alleged racism is why he’s allegedly “so vicious against a black president.”


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By contrast, Breitbart ran a video of Sherrod that, unknown to him, was out of context, and later, according to media reports, Breitbart expressed regret. Sherrod became nationally famous, lost her job, saw her reputation rehabilitated within a day, was offered a new job, had a private conversation with a President of the United States of whom she thinks highly, and is now a hero to many. I’d be very much surprised if she hasn’t received some lucrative speaking offers.

Ultimately, no harm, no foul.

Furthermore, while Breitbart didn’t know the famous first video was out of context, Sherrod has to know she has no evidence Breitbart wants “all black people” to be slaves. Publishing the video without checking it out first it was an error, but it was nothing personal against Sherrod, and an unintentional error. When Sherrod said Breitbart wants black people to be slaves she was being intentionally malicious and irresponsibly inflammatory.

There’s no doubt about it. When the scales are weighed, Sherrod’s offense is far greater. She owes Breitbart an apology.


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I don’t expect he’ll get one.

Shirley Sherrod has also said opponents of ObamaCare are racists.

I don’t suppose we’ll get an apology, either.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.


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