Contemporary opinion, including that of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, says a state’s right to secede died with the hundreds of thousands of bloodied victims of the Civil War and that the sentiment behind the dozens of petitions on the White House website seeking permission for most of the 50 individual governments to leave the union will be fruitless.


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But historians would note that Thomas Jefferson, a “pole star among political philosophers because he based his politics on the eternal, self-evident, fundamental truths that all men are created free and equal and that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inherent and inalienable rights, among which are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” believed states have a right to leave the U.S.

It was in a letter to William B. Giles on Dec. 26, 1825, that Jefferson addressed the issue after participating in the fight over separation from England, the rise of a new nation and the tribulations it faced in its first decades.

In a letter marked “not intended for the public eye,” Jefferson wrote that states “should separate from our companions only when the sole alternatives left, are the dissolution of our Union with them, or submission to a government without limitation of powers.”

He continued, “Between these two evils, when we must make a choice, there can be no hesitation.”

Read more at WND. By Bob Unruh.


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