Missouri will be a key “swing” state in next November’s decisive vote for the Presidency. In 2008, Republican candidate John McCain barely won the state against President Obama, beating him by just 3,903 votes statewide, 49.4% to 49.3%. But judging by voter interest, or lack thereof, in Barack Obama’s re-election last night in the all-party Missouri Presidential preference ballot, the President does not appear to have improved his chances of winning the state in the 2012 Presidential election.

Obama was surprisingly only able to gain a relatively dismal 19.7% of the total vote in the “Show Me” State, barely capturing more votes than Republican Mitt Romney, with 64,405 to Romney’s 63,826. Rick Santorum was the big winner, with nearly twice Obama’s and Romney’s votes, at 138,957, or close to 43% of the total votes of all candidates statewide. In comparison to the votes given to the Republican candidates and other minor candidates on the ballot, Obama’s showing in Missouri was dismal.

While the election night was a Santorum blow-out and might be called a significant rejection of Romney on the Republican side, the significance of the returns in such an important Presidential “battle ground” state also reveal a real lack of enthusiasm among Obama voters that now cannot be ignored by the President’s campaign team. The mainstream media has pretty much blacked-out reporting and analysis on Obama’s fairly consistent lackluster returns in the 2012 Presidential primaries where voters have been able to actually chose for or against him on a paper ballot. Though Obama’s nomination as the Democratic standard-bearer is a foregone conclusion, his primary vote performance can also be seen as a sort of measure of how motivated his core support in the Democrat party will be to actually show up at the polls in November and propel him into another four years of service as President. And so far, with vote totals down over 50% in the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary vote, and now with the results in Missouri, Obama and his core supporters have little to show for these early primary races.

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