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Photo credit: Goosefriend (Creative Commons)

Admittedly, I do not watch ‘Duck Dynasty.’ It’s not particularly my cup of tea, but I know about it and that the family featured in the series is Christian. Today, my Facebook feed has absolutely blown up with stories of Phil Robertson, the family patriarch, and what he told GQ magazine about homosexuality and race issues in the South. Here are some key quotes from the GQ interview from Phil Robertson:

“It seems like, to me, a vagina—as a man—would be more desirable than a man’s anus. That’s just me. I’m just thinking: There’s more there! She’s got more to offer. I mean, come on, dudes! You know what I’m saying? But hey, sin: It’s not logical, my man. It’s just not logical.”

“I never, with my eyes, saw the mistreatment of any black person. Not once. Where we lived was all farmers. The blacks worked for the farmers. I hoed cotton with them. I’m with the blacks, because we’re white trash. We’re going across the field…. They’re singing and happy. I never heard one of them, one black person, say, ‘I tell you what: These doggone white people’—not a word!… Pre-entitlement, pre-welfare, you say: Were they happy? They were godly; they were happy; no one was singing the blues.”

Phil is known for being very open and very honest with his beliefs–it’s part of why the show is so popular. But A&E, the channel the show appears on, has decided to indefinitely suspend Phil from ‘Duck Dynasty’ for his comments.

I sort of understand the logic–such statements make people very angry in this day and age, and the desire to appease people for the sake of political correctness is strong. However, A&E may have committed suicide over this, as ‘Duck Dynasty’ is their most popular show by leaps and bounds; and the sort of people who watch it aren’t all that likely to be interested in political correctness.  Thus, by getting all worked up over these comments, A&E is only serving to damage itself–and no matter how you slice it, that’s not a good business model.

Now, I’m not particularly interested in addressing the comments themselves. Everybody has an opinion, and mine is no more or less likely to change anyone else’s.  I do want to discuss the larger issue, though, and that is this culture of outrage we live in.  It seems no matter where you go, somebody is upset. Somebody is angry. Somebody feels deeply offended by something or someone.

We are offended far too much–so much so that we can no longer have disagreements without getting mean or condemning someone for thinking a bit differently than we believe should be the case.  As a country, we’ve gone so far on the tolerance scale that we’ve magically become intolerant.  We’re a nation of reactionary revanchist provocateurs who can’t handle dissent. We have no balance, no acceptance, not even free speech, really.  Sure, you can say what you like, but be prepared–consequences are swift and lasting, if the majority doesn’t like what you say.  We are a nation that is becoming more and more entrenched in the fine print; you can do this, and this, and this, but with a thousand caveats and exceptions to the rule.

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The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

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