A young married couple, Paul and Nancy, were neighbors of mine back in the seventies. Nancy was extremely excited because an unexpected opportunity arose for her to attend college. This would broaden her horizons and enable her to pursue opportunities beyond her then-current minimum-wage jobs. Paul was dead set against it. He confided in me, “I’m afraid if she gets educated, she may not want me anymore.” I thought, So rather than allowing Nancy, whom you profess to love, to be all she can be, you would prefer to keep her down.

In the eighties, I was a member of a team of six artists at a Baltimore TV station. They hired a new kid. Jeff was talented, enthusiastic, and ambitious. Whenever someone came into the art department with a request and our supervisor was unavailable, (while other artists ignored them, thinking it’s not my job), Jeff stepped up and took care of them. Jeff’s attitude caused tension between him and our union.


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While the union could not nail Jeff for doing anything outside of the restrictions of our contract, the consensus was that he was too friendly with management and too eager to benefit the company. The real conflict was that Jeff’s nature drove him to excellence, but our union encouraged group mediocrity.

I share these two stories as examples of attempts to stifle personal greatness. Folks, liberals (black and white) have been stifling black American individuality and greatness for years through a deceptive shroud of compassion. In reality, liberals’ true attitude towards independent blacks is, “Who the heck do you think you are? How dare you achieve success without us?”

Read More: By Lloyd Marcus, American Thinker


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