In George Orwell’s famous dystopian novel 1984, high officials direct robotic bureaucrats to alter the past—“pushed down the memory hole” is the famous phrase–all in order to prop up the state apparatus. Names are changed, facts disappear, and new facts are born.


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Let’s look at the past for a moment:

April 15, 2013, at 2:29 p.m.: a bomb goes off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. A second bomb goes off thirteen seconds later.

A Saudi national by the name of Abdul Rahman Ali Alharbi, near ground zero of the first blast, receives significant injuries to his legs, consisting of burns and embedded shrapnel.

He immediately runs from the scene and is quickly tackled by a bystander, thinking he is the bomber.


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The police take him into custody and transport him to the hospital. At this point, he is only a person of interest.

By 4:46 p.m., he is named as a suspect and placed under armed guard.

At exactly 7:29 p.m., over twenty ATF, FBI, and DHS agents swarm Alharbi’s apartment in nearby Revere, carrying out dozens of bags of evidence.

Alharbi is quickly identified as having some connection to the bombing.

Slam dunk. Suspect identified and held accountable. Game over.

Not exactly. Enter the Saudi government.

At 10:00 a.m. the next day, Secretary of State John Kerry meets with with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal. Shortly thereafter, President Obama meets with the Saudi ambassador, Adel al-Jubeir. Both meetings are unscheduled and held in secret (and more than likely concern Alharbi.)

At 4 p.m. the following day,  a criminal file is created for Alharbi, charging him with terrorism and linking him to the Boston bombing. The NTC (National Terrorism Center), under ICE,  classifies the matter under section 212 3B,  “Security and related grounds/Terrorist activities.” The Obama administration deems Alharbi a national security threat, but instead of arresting him, recommends he be deported.

Later that evening, Investigative Project on Terrorism chief Steve Emerson says on the Sean Hannity Show that according to his sources, Alharbi is being quietly deported at the request of the Saudi government.

At 5:35 p.m., Alharbi’s deportation file is altered—“cauterized” was the word an insider used— authorized from the highest levels, revoking deportation and further made to look like no deportation proceedings had been initiated.

This alteration is authorized by either the head of the National Security Agency or State Department (and may have been directly authorized by Barack Hussein Obama himself.)

When this information begins to leak to the media, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano is summoned before Congress and questioned about the matter. She calls the information a rumor,  stating that Alharbi was not being deported and that he was never a suspect (and, when pressed, refuses to answer any further questions.)

The same day, ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) states that the information about Alharbi is “categorically false.”

But according to a Congressional Source, the information released was in fact completely accurate.

Alharbi was in fact linked to the Boston terrorist attack. The Congressman who questioned Janet Napolitano, Rep. Jeff Duncan, was actually in possession of Alharbi’s file and knew that Napolitano was lying.

What else did we know about Alharbi?

When he received his student visa, he had been on a terrorist watch list and should have never been allowed into the country.

He has at least a dozen connections to al-Qaeda members, some presently being held in Gitmo.

And, probably most shocking of all, he was a regular visitor at the White House.

This is most likely the main reason Barack Obama tried to whisk him out of the country so quickly.

But alas, all was shoved down the memory hole, never to be heard about again.

Names were changed, facts disappeared, and new facts were born.

Welcome to Barack Hussein Obama’s 1984.


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