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In fact, its enormity is perhaps best measured by these organizations’ utterly unhinged response. For instance, the always entertaining FFRF was quick to suggest a retaliatory “path forward” for all Christ-haters.

On its website, this Christophobic group, headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, posted an essay calling the high court’s decision “disastrous for state-church separation,” and frantically warned that “This decision could be the equivalent of Dred Scott or Plessy for our [anti-Christian] cause.”


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The essay brazenly called for “mockery” of God, summoning atheists to infiltrate any public forum that might open in prayer and then to “voice disapproval … by booing, making thumbs down gestures, blowing a raspberry, or by making other audible sounds signifying disapproval. …”

“Citizens may also abruptly walk out of government proceedings and then make an auspicious re-entry as soon as the prayer has ended,” suggested the group.

The stated goal? “Public mockery and ridicule” of Jesus Christ and all Christians.

Psalm 14:1 observes, “The fool says in his heart, ‘There is no God.’ They are corrupt, their deeds are vile; there is no one who does good.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to the FFRF for once again proving true these profound words.

A couple days after it came down, the American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer cut to the heart of this landmark ruling, writing at BarbWire.com, “[T]he Court in Greece v. Galloway changed the standard from ‘endorsement’ to ‘coercion.’ A violation of the First Amendment can now only be claimed if coercion can be demonstrated. …

“The Court swept away with a backhanded swat the ridiculous argument that merely being offended is sufficient to create a breach of the Constitution. Just because someone’s feelings have been hurt does not mean there is some cataclysmic break in the space-time constitutional continuum. In a burst of brilliant, luminescent and concise reasoning, the Court flatly declared what we all know to be true: ‘Offense … does not equate to coercion.’ Feast your eyes on that. ‘Offense … does not equate to coercion.’”

Indeed, this decision also swept away the church-state separatist sand from which the ACLU and other anti-Christian segregationists have built their entire fragile, cultural Marxist platform.


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For instance, the ACLU has, in the past, absurdly claimed, “The message of the Establishment Clause [to the U.S. Constitution] is that religious activities must be treated differently from other activities to ensure against governmental support for religion.”

Hokum, says the high court:

“The First Amendment is not a majority rule, and government may not seek to define permissible categories of religious speech. Once it invites prayer into the public sphere, government must permit a prayer giver to address his or her own God or gods as conscience dictates, unfettered by what an administrator or judge considers to be nonsectarian.”

“Adults often encounter speech they find disagreeable,” concluded the court; “and an Establishment Clause violation is not made out any time a person experiences a sense of affront from the expression of contrary religious views. …”

Of course, we’re not really talking about “adults” here.

We’re talking about liberals.

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The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.



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